Category Archives: Karate

Shotokan Karate Lesson Plans

Wow!

I am so thrilled with the response to the latest newsletter announcing the Karate Lesson Plan Booklet that has been added to the paid subscriber area of MyShotokan, known as Sensei’s Office.

There have been so many replies, questions and requests for more information, that I’m working on putting together ONE FREE CHAPTER of the exclusive Lesson Plan Booklet, to be included with the Shotokan Kata Videos in the Free Members area!

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Summer of 2007 Karate Week

Sensei Doug’s Week of Karate
For the next 10 days, you get to come along, virtually, on my journey of Shotokan Training. Out of the blue, I’ve come upon the… opportunity… to work from Winnipeg for the next week-and-a-half – and, while I’m here, I’m going to take advantage of some intensive Shotokan karate training at the headquaters Dojo for Western Canada.
Here’s some of my karate training goals as I start off the week:

  • Review and practice all Senior Kata
  • Learn Junro Shodan
  • Study how to teach my intermediate students to create “Drive” in their stances
  • Video Tape and publish video clips of each training session within Sensei’s Office on MyShotokan.
    Monday evening. After a seemingly endless 6 hour drive from Atikokan to Winnipeg, I was treated to a special evening training session with Sensei Don DeGrow, a Shotokan Yondan, and my Sister Jill, who is a Shodan. This is the monday of a long-weekend, and there wasn’t a normal karate class scheduled. We started off at the beginning and practiced each of the Heian Kata, then the three Tekki Katas. I noticed a small change in Tekki Sandan – I’ll have to review the videos to verify.As we started our review of the senior kata, we practiced them in groups. Bassai Dai, Kanku Dai, Empi and Jion are needed for someone testing for Shodan. I found that I recalled Gankaku, Jutte, and Hengetsu – but I was a bit rusty at them, and had to watch Don and Jill in a few parts. After a few more repetitions I’ll be able to start asking about practicing applications.

    Next we reviewed Sochin, Bassai Sho and Chinte. I could follow along for these, but they were distictly more rusty, and will require more than just a couple times through each kata to get them back in my repetoure. Kanku Sho and Nijushiho are at about the same level of disrepair.

    Unsu and Gojushiho Sho were another step down in proficiancy for me.

    We practiced Junro Shodan 6 or 7 times and I’m starting to recall the first 10 moves or so before I get lost… I’ll have it by the end of tomorrow.

    I only did a short introduction to the stretching routine Alanna has been working our club through. I’ll need to write out a short list of the static-active stretching routine so I keep to the schedule of long periods of relaxed stretching after each training session over the next 10 days.

    Through the week I’ll need to find an instructor to help me learn Meikyo, Wankan and Jiin from scratch – but I’ll leave them for a couple days.

    Following the extra training Don gave us, Jill and I were invited to his home for dinner. An oriental influence is evident in the decor and garden of their delightful and cosy home.

    In order to re-inforce all the kata information Sensei Don reviewed with us, I’m going to take a few moments to stretch and watch some of the Shotokan Kata Videos.

  • Karate and pressure points–a powerful technique

    Painful, nerve-wracking… yet instructional.

     

    When a seventh degree black belt and pressure point specialist demonstrates his technique, even seasoned karate instructors collapse in pain.

     

    When Sensei Chris Smaby found Atikokan Karate Club instructor Doug Lampi’s pressure points, “I hit the floor before I even realized I was falling,” recalled Lampi, a second-degree black belt. “The points he hit were very painful.”

    read more

    Gichin Funakoshi – Founder of Modern Karate-do

    Gichin Funakoshi

    The Father of Modern Karate-Do

    (1868-1957)

    Gichin Funakoshi (1868–1957) was an Okinawan karate master who formally introduced karate to the Japanese mainland in 1921. Shotokan is named after Gichin Funakoshi’s pen name, Shoto, which means pine waves or wind in the pines. Shotokan means Shoto’s house or Shoto’s school. Funakoshi had trained in both of the popular styles of Okinawan karate of the time: Shorei-ryu and Shorin-ryu.

    Funakoshi published the following books: Karate-Do Nyumon the Introductory Text, Karate-Do Kyohan the Master Text, Karate Jutsu the Original Teachings and Karate-Do My Way of Life

    Shotokan Karate

    If you have been looking to increase your health and fitness with balance components of stretching and strength training – then Shotokan Karate might be the sport for you.

    MyShotokan offers the Shotokan martial arts student with Shokokan karate videos.